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Putting an end to
impunity in Africa.

With 33 nations in Africa being party to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, Africa still has a long way to go to ensure that war crimes and human rights abuses are things of the past.

black african man staring into the distance

Justice, for Everyone

By upholding all treaty principles of the Rome Statute of the ICC and associated obligations of State parties, we ensure that all Heads of State and decision makers are held are accountable for all crimes.

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Join the Fight
for Justice!

The African Network for International Criminal Justice membership is opened to any civil society organization working in the area of international justice in any part of Africa, or whose mandate covers promoting ICJ and fights against impunity in Africa or in any Africa state.

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Our goal is to build a strong civil society voice and partnerships across Africa in the fight against impunity using the mechanism of the International Criminal Court and other regional and international Justice systems.
We do this through:

Justice, for Everyone

By upholding all treaty principles of the Rome Statute of the ICC and associated obligations of State parties, we ensure that all Heads of State are accountable.

What We do

Advocacy

We prioritize advocacy to put pressure on government to ratify, domesticate and implement the Rome Statute of the ICC

Engagement

Engaging in sensitization and information sharing with the people of Africa on the principles and content of the Rome Statute 

Liasons

Maintaining direct, sustained and constructive, but credible and independent relationship with national governments…

Putting an end to impunity in Africa

With 33 nations in Africa being party to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, Africa still has a long way to go to ensure that war crimes and human rights abuses are things of the past.

Latest Publications

Le Royaume-Uni Fait Pression Avec un Projet de loi Visant à Protéger les Soldats Contre les Accusations de Crimes de Guerre

Le gouvernement du Royaume-Uni va de l'avant avec un projet de loi qui vise à protéger ses soldats contre les...
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The UK Pressing Ahead With Bill to Protect Soldiers From War Crimes Charges

The United Kingdom government is pressing ahead with proposed legislation that seeks to shield its soldiers from prosecution for any...
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À Qui Profite la Mort du Président Tchadien Deby?

L'assassinat d'Idriss Deby révèle un réseau géopolitique enchevêtré qui est susceptible d'approfondir les divisions internes au Tchad. Le général Idriss...
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Who Benefits From The Death of Chad’s President Deby?

The killing of Idriss Deby reveals a tangled geopolitical web that is likely to deepen internal divisions in Chad. General...
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Pourquoi la Cour Pénale Internationale n’a-t-elle Pas Plus de Soutien?

CE MOIS, le président Joe Biden a levé les sanctions contre Fatou Bensouda, la procureure en chef sortante de la...
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Why Does the International Criminal Court Not Have More Support?

THIS MONTH President Joe Biden lifted sanctions on Fatou Bensouda, the outgoing chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC),...
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Les Victimes Veulent une Peine à Perpétuité Pour Les Atrocités de Guerre en Ouganda

La Chambre de première instance IX de la Cour pénale internationale a déclaré Dominic Ongwen coupable en février 2021 de...
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Victims Want Life Sentence for Ugandan War Atrocities

The Trial Chamber IX of the International Criminal Court found Dominic Ongwen guilty in February 2021 of 61 crimes against...
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UNESCO And Oxford University To Launch A Massive Open Online Course For Judicial Actors On International Standards On Freedom Of Expression And The Safety Of Journalists

UNESCO and the Bonavero Institute of Human Rights at the University of Oxford are launching a joint Massive Open Online...
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Our Member Coalitions:

Together, for justice

Civil society organizations (CSOs) across Africa met in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire on 23-25 January 2018 and made commitment to work together to fight against impunity in Africa, to support one another in pursuing accountability for international crimes…

The Rome Statute of the ICC

The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, commonly known as the Rome Statute is the treaty that established the International Criminal Court (ICC). It was adopted at a diplomatic conference in Rome on 17th July 1998 and it entered into force on the 1st of July 2002.

After World War II, and some of the worst atrocities committed in the history of humankind taking place in the 20th century, the international community through the United Nations decided to take this action to bring the perpetrators of the most heinous crimes against humanity to justice. The creation of an International Criminal Court thus became a reality.

Stay informed about the latest news on international criminal justice!